TURN OFF YOUR PUSH NOTIFICATIONS. ALL OF THEM

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HOTLITTLEPOTATO

PUSH NOTIFICATIONS ARE ruining my life. Yours too, I bet. Download more than a few apps and the notifications become a non-stop, cacophonous waterfall of nonsense. Here’s just part of an afternoon on my phone:

“Hi David! We found new Crown jewels and Bottle caps Pins for you!”

“Everyone’s talking about Bill Nye’s new book, Everything All at Once. Read a free sample.”

“Alex just posted for the first time in a while.”

I get notifications when an acquaintance comments on a stranger’s Facebook posts, when shows I don’t care about come to Netflix, and every single day at 6 PM when the crossword puzzle becomes available. Recently, I got a buzz from my close personal friends at Yelp. “We found a hot new business for you,” it said. I opened the notification, on the off chance that Yelp had finally found the hot new business I’ve been waiting for. It did not. So I closed Yelp, stared into space for a second, and then opened Instagram. Productivity over.

Over the last few years, there’s been an increasingly loud call for a re-evaluation of the relationship between humans and smartphones. For all the good that phones do, their grip on our eyes, ears, and thoughts creates real and serious problems. “I know when I take [technology] away from my kids what happens,” Tony Fadell, a former senior VP at Apple who helped invent both the iPod and the iPhone, said in a recent interview. “They literally feel like you’re tearing a piece of their person away from them. They get emotional about it, very emotional. They go through withdrawal for two to three days.”

 Smartphones aren’t the problem. It’s all the buzzing and dinging, endlessly calling for your attention. A Deloitte studyin 2016 found that people look at their phones 47 times a day on average; for young people, more like 82. Apple proudly announced in 2013 that 7.4 trillion push notifications had been pushed through its servers. The intervening four years have not reversed the trend.

There’s a solution, though: Kill your notifications. Yes, really. Turn them all off. (You can leave on phone calls and text messages, if you must, but nothing else.) You’ll discover that you don’t miss the stream of cards filling your lockscreen, because they never existed for your benefit. They’re for brands and developers, methods by which thirsty growth hackers can grab your attention anytime they want. Allowing an app to send you push notifications is like allowing a store clerk to grab you by the ear and drag you into their store. You’re letting someone insert a commercial into your life anytime they want. Time to turn it off.

Push and Pull

Originally, push notifications were designed to keep you out of your phone rather than constantly drawing you in. When BlackBerry launched push email in 2003, users rejoiced: They didn’t need to constantly check their inbox for fear they’d miss important messages. When email comes, BlackBerry promised, your phone will tell you. Until then, don’t worry about it.

Apple made push a system-wide feature in 2008, and Google did the same soon after. Suddenly, there was a way for anyone to jump into your phone when they wanted your attention. Push notifications proved to be a marketer’s dream: They’re functionally impossible to tell apart from a text or email without looking, so you have to look before you can dismiss. “Push messages serve an important role in an app’s user engagement,” digital marketing company Localytics wrote in 2015, “and there are no signs pointing to a decrease any time soon.”

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In fairness, the platforms and companies responsible for this mess have tried intermittently to clean up. The Apple Watch was initially conceived as a way to keep you off your phone, offering clever filters and even adaptive vibrations to help differentiate between notifications you care about and those you don’t. Instead, the Watch turned your wrist into yet another buzzable surface, this one even harder to ignore. After years of torturing users, Apple finally made it easier to dismiss all your notifications at once. Meanwhile, Google recently simplified the process of turning off notifications for specific apps, and plans in the next version of Android to give users more control over which notifications they want to receive at all.

And still, you could see how it could easily be better. You could tell Outlook to notify you only when you get something from your boss or partner. You could say “never send me coupons,” and ask every app to comply. You could have some notifications come through during work and shut off when you get home. Facebook could figure out who you actually care about, and notify you accordingly. In every case, that would lead to fewer and better notifications. Great for you, bad for the companies trying to steal your attention.

At this point, notification management is a losing battle. News companies send more and more, trying to get you into their apps rather than their competitors. Games beg you to play more, so you’ll spend more on in-app purchases. Ad-based apps need you to open the app so you’ll see the ads. You can turn off all the Facebook notifications you don’t want (assuming you can figure out how) but Facebook will just invent and opt you into new types. There’s no incentive for anyone to slow the pace of pushes, not even Google or Apple, who are just as happy when you look at your phone. Nothing’s going to get better without your interference.

Peace and Quiet

Neither Android nor iOS offers an easy way to turn off notifications en-masse. In both cases, you have to dive deep into Settings, then go app-by-app to turn them off. It’s a massive pain, but completely worthwhile. Throw on an episode of Glow (which my notifications tell me is now available on Netflix, by the way) and just hammer through. Turn off notifications on all the social apps, the shopping apps, the fitness apps, the notifications from Netflix, Spotify, and Kindle. If you want to leave texting, phone calls, and WhatsApp, fine. Everything else has to go.

If you absolutely can’t handle the idea of missing notifications, here’s an alternative: On iOS, turn off everything except “Show in Notification Center.” No sounds, no badges, no lock screen, no banner alerts. Nothing will interrupt you, but all the notifications will still appear when you pull down the windowshade. On Android, you can choose “Show Silently,” a similar setup.

It’s not like turning off notifications shuts you out from using the apps you like. It just puts you back in control; you’re on your phone when you want to be, not when Amazon’s data says you’re likely to buy stuff. I still check Twitter all the time, but I’m not forcibly thrust into Twitter because four people happened to like someone’s photo. Apps like Instagram and Facebook are built to show you the best stuff every time you open the app—you won’t miss much by ignoring notifications. And if not getting notifications means you forget to even open the app or check your phone for a while? Well, you’re welcome.

I turned off notifications on every app on my phone, save for a handful: phone, texts, and my calendar, plus Outlook and Slack, because I’m addicted to work. I’m a far happier person for it. You might think I’m crazy, that I’m missing all the good stuff happening in the world because nothing alerts me anymore. Feel free to tell me all about it! I’ll see it next time I check Twitter. Which will be when I feel like it, and not one second before.

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What do marketing orgs look like in the martech age? Let’s find out

marketing_org_martech_world

 

First, this is a copy of a blog post from Scott Brinker, who continues to provide invaluable strategic insights as a thought leader in the world of marketing technology. Thank you Scott!

————————————————————————————————————————————-

I know, you get asked to participate in a ton of surveys. You’re super busy, and most of the time, the results of these studies are of dubious value to your actual work. So it’s easy to pass on taking them.

But if you like the content of my blog, and have ever found it helpful, I’d personally ask you to participate in this survey: Marketing Organizations in the Age of Martech.

I also believe that the results of this one may be quite valuable to you.

The thesis of this study is that marketing technology is reshaping the organization of the marketing department. Directly, marketing technology and marketing operations have become prominent roles, with expanding teams of their own.

But indirectly, martech also changes the way the rest of marketing is able to function. Marketing can — if it develops the necessary organizational capital — orchestrate across channels, adapt to feedback in rapid fashion, leverage data from a myriad of sources, run experiments, trial new innovations, and more.

In this new environment, is marketing best served by organizing around activities, channels, products, customer segments, or stages of the buyer’s journey? Or some other structure? What capabilities does it centralize?

Having talked to many CMOs over the past few months, I’ve come to believe that there are some powerful new options for organizing modern marketing teams. I’d love for us as a community to get greater visibility into what those possibilities look like across a variety of real-world marketing departments.

This survey, Marketing Organizations in the Age of Martech, asks you for three pieces of your organizational structure (titles or roles only, no names):

  1. What roles report to your CMO (or highest-level marketing executive)?
  2. Who is in charge of marketing technology management and what roles report to them?
  3. Who is in charge of marketing operations — if that’s a separate role from marketing technology — and what roles report to them?

You don’t have to identify yourself or your company to participate. And all data will be aggregated and anonymized before it is published. But we will share the results at the end with everyone in the community — no paywall or high-priced report at the end. We’ll do some nice visualizations to reveal the different org patterns that we discover.

As an extra little “thank you,” we will also provide everyone who completes the survey with a discount code for the upcoming MarTech conference in Boston, October 2-4.

Please. Take 10 minutes to contribute to this survey now. Thank you!!

martech_org_study

P.S. The marketing org chart shown at the top of this post is an amalgamation of several of the common structures that I’ve seen recently. But this Marketing Organizations in the Age of Martech study will give us a lot more real-world data on the different structures being used.

Please participate — thank you!

Pricepoints! Bookmarked InsightWhat’s Proximity Computing?

I bookmarked What’s Proximity Computing? on Medium.

Pricepoints! Bookmarked InsightThe Connection Between Concussions, CTE and Acts of Violence

I bookmarked The Connection Between Concussions, CTE and Acts of Violence on Medium.

What Digital Business Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are you using?

Digital business key performance indicators (KPIs) designed to assess the progress of digital transformation are still not widely used or universally understood — it’s a key critical success factor essential to continued investment. These metrics and analytics should stand alone initially but always tied to the overall corporate strategic initiatives.

what_is_chief_digital_officer-100340171-orig

How would you describe your transformation progress? What set of relevant KPIs specific to the digital business transformation effort are your guidance?

With most enterprises already using a robust set of enterprise KPIs to measure the performance of their business, it may seem superfluous to create yet another set of KPIs. However, as with any large transformation or project, it is helpful to temporarily create transitional KPIs for the duration of the digital business effort. In Digital Business KPIs: Defining and Measuring Success, research firm Gartner sets out to look at how enterprise CEOs, chief digital officers and CIOs must move beyond the transformation stage and set metrics and goals that lay out a true digital business journey. In fact, according to Gartner, CEOs, chief digital officers (CDOs) and CIOs must:

Move beyond the transformation stage and set metrics and goals that lay out the digital business journey.

My experience validates the need to work closely from the outset with each senior business unit executive to quantify the potential economic benefits of digitalization.

Use startup-style metrics for new ventures, acquisitions and business models.

Curated from http://www.consultparagon.com

Are CMOs The New Owner Of The Data And Technology Around Which Companies Should Organize?

Are CMOs The New Owner Of The Data And Technology Around Which Companies Should Organize?

Thank you Steve Olenski!

5/25/2017

Let’s cut right to the chase here, kids. The answer to the question posed in the title is “largely yes” according to Alicia Hatch, CMO of Deloitte Digital. She cites the 2016 Gartner Spend Survey which found that CMOs had one of the highest technology spends of any C-suite member and is on track to overtake CIOs in 2017.

GML_CMO Tech Spend_Infographic Gartner Marketers 2017

To further support her belief one can point to Forrester’s report C-Suite Tech Purchasing Patterns which predicts that by 2018 about 36% of all marketing technology-related new project spending will be fully controlled by CMOs.

Andrew Bartels, Forrester Research analyst and lead author of the report is quick to point out, however, that while the “growing tech-saaviness of business leaders and the wider availability of cloud solutions does mean that business leaders are playing a bigger role in the front end of this process… the persistence of licensed software, the growing adoption of cloud as a replacement for licensed software, and challenges of implementing and optimizing solutions mean that CIOs and tech management teams still play a dominant role in overall tech purchases by businesses.”

Mix and Match With Hatch

When I spoke with Alicia, in addition to getting her thoughts on CMOs becoming the new owner of the data and technology around which companies should organize, I wanted to picked her brain on a few other topics including recent changes she’s witnessed, what the difference between data-driven and data-informed campaigns is and more.

Steve Olenski: What have been the biggest changes in marketing you’ve seen over the past 6 months?

Alicia Hatch: Marketing leaders across verticals and industries are intensely focused on marketing technology, attempting to build the most perfect stacks for gaining the most precise customer insights. There are higher expectations of CMOs than ever before, and increased pressure to do more with fewer resources.

These shifts have also happened against a backdrop of a bit of digital disillusionment, spurred by brand safety concerns. While marketers work around the clock to ensure their brands are well-regarded via the distribution of consistent, powerful messaging, there is an increased awareness to the fact that brands cannot control every piece of digital content that may influence how a consumer or company views a particular brand. Companies are becoming more cautious when selecting where to run advertisements, for example, knowing that their ad could run alongside an offensive message or one that simply does not align with the character of the brand they represent.

Olenski: I read that you believe the evolution of the CMO has driven the rise of martech. Can you elaborate on that? Why do you believe this is the case?

Hatch: Marketing technology originated from the need for marketers to better understand their customers and create more thoughtful, personalized and simultaneously automated campaigns that help build brand identity.

As the role of CMO has evolved from being a pure brand ambassador to a central growth driver of the business, modern CMOs have become intensely data-driven. We must demonstrate we can be predictable revenue drivers with highly optimized spend. In order to do this, we must architect our marketing technology around critical data flows and not just capabilities. We must create data-driven cultures by designing workflows around these data flows.

To effectively act on these imperatives, the martech industry had to rapidly advance to catch up with the needs of the sophisticated modern CMO. Innovation in predictive analytics is now being driven by the new marketing imperative to not only demonstrate business impact but to continuously optimize it.

Why Creativity Matters More in the Age of Mobile

Facebook IQ Industry Research

Why Creativity Matters More in the Age of Mobile

Mobile has not only ushered in a new era of consumption for people, it’s given marketers a new canvas to tell stories. So why, then, are marketers building for mobile under the constraints of briefs and media plans built for other mediums, like TV and print? How can we as an industry break conventional norms and redefine storytelling and campaign planning now that the thumb is in charge?

 We’re beginning to dig into these questions. The Marketing Science and Creative Shop teams at Facebook partnered to examine over two years of internal and commissioned research to better understand how behavioral shifts are impacting marketing and creative strategies. Through our examination of over 2,000 ads on Facebook and Instagram and various studies of how people engage with mobile and feed-based environments, we are building a foundational understanding of Why Creativity Matters More in the Age of Mobile.

The results of our report aren’t meant to give new “rules” for mobile marketing. There is no guaranteed formula for creative success on mobile, just as there is no guaranteed formula for a blockbuster movie, best-selling book or hit TV show. But if you’re looking to know more about this new context for creativity, you’ve come to the right place.

“As people move across mobile spaces, powerful ideas and excellence in craft are critical to capturing attention and connecting brands and people to create real value.”
—Andrew Keller, Global Creative Director, Facebook

 What it means for marketers

The opportunity is literally at our fingertips. And it’s time for marketers, strategists and creatives alike to connect with people, get inspired and play more with their creative as we take on the mobile frontier together.

Connect with people where they are: Mobile consumption is not TV consumption, and connecting with people where they are is key to capturing attention. Mobile consumption is also non-linear and happens fast—people can recall mobile News Feed content at a statistically significant rate after only 0.25 seconds of looking at a post.1

Get inspired: Reimagine storytelling. Use data as your muse to build sharper briefs and allow creativity to flow. Mobile also allows for versatility in creative forms. Mix and match your assets and throw standards and preconceived notions out the window.

Play more: The journey we’re on is a marathon, not a sprint. As we have this opportunity to invent the future, we also have to manage our present. By playing with new ad formats and creative types, testing new approaches and, most importantly, putting mobile at the center of our strategies, we can find new and better ways to inspire people to stop, look, feel, share, do and buy.

Thank you Facebook for providing this content.

1 “Capturing Attention in Feed: The Science Behind Effective Video Creative” by Facebook IQ, Apr 20, 2016.