Pricepoints! Bookmarked InsightWhy Most People Will Never Be Successful

I bookmarked Why Most People Will Never Be Successful on Medium.

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Pricepoints! Bookmarked InsightMetrics Are a Lie

I bookmarked Metrics Are a Lie on Medium.

Top 10 Influencer Brands

 

Study finds the Ritz's influencers in March had highest proportion of fake followers.
Study finds the Ritz’s influencers in March had highest proportion of fake followers. Credit: Ritz-Carlton

Procter & Gamble Co. has been vigorously rooting out fraud and unverified data from its digital buys while also doing more influencer marketing, but those two things may be at cross purposes. In a new study, two P&G brands last month ranked among the top 10 in using paid influencers with fake followers.

The data, which comes from Points North Group (March 2018), shows that Pampers and Olay ranked No. 4 and 10, respectively, on the list of brands with the most fake followers among their paid influencers last month; Pampers with 32 percent and Olay with 19 percenty. Topping the study’s list: Ritz-Carlton, with a whopping 78 percent of fake followers for its influencers.

Ritz-Carlton didn’t respond to requests for comment. P&G spokeswoman Tressie Rose declined to comment on report specifics, since the company hasn’t seen the data and isn’t familiar with Points North or its methodology. “There are a lot of companies out ther offering services to combat this,” she says. “Bot fraud is an industry-wide issue and one we’re continuing to actively work on.”

Even as use of influencer marketing by big marketers grows, so do questions about how it’s measured. Reach numbers used to measure influencer campaigns often come from raw follower counts, without regard to how many followers actually saw posts—or were real.

Numbers marketers usually get on influencer campaigns come either from their influencers or third-party providers “grading their own homework,” as Points North co-founder Peter Storck sees it. He’s now working with clients, whom he says he doesn’t yet have approval to name, to help “get real measures of their influencer marketing, because they don’t get them from the partners they work with.”

Points North is a firm founded by former executives with analytics experience going back to the old Jupiter Research digital ad measurement business, as well as with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (now part of the Association of National Advertisers) and such influencer networks as CrowdTap and House Party. Storck’s joined co-founder Sean Spielberg, who was with Crowdtap, to form what Storck calls “the Nielsen of influencer marketing.”

Storck says he’s unaware of any other third-party audience measurement dedicated to influencers space, though some firms have sought out third-party validation of their reach numbers other ways. Cincinnati-based Ahalogy, for example, only charges clients for digital impressions verified by Oracle’s Moat on content created by its influencers.

Points North is releasing its first public data in the form of lists of the biggest spenders on influencer marketing in March, the most efficient spenders based on cost per thousand impressions (CPM), and those with the most fake followers. Storck says work for private clients has included a large cosmetics brand where $600,000 out of a $2 million outlay for influencers was for impressions that weren’t seen or were seen by fake followers.

The spending data is based on analysis of influencers used by brands and industry norms on payments, which Points North founders say average 0.3 cents per follower per post across the industry based on their prior sell-side experience and more recent input from clients. It’s an estimate, but one they say they’re looking to apply consistently.

Fake follower counts are based on Points North scanning followers of influencers to sort out such things as accounts making comments in languages that don’t make sense for the content or the influencer, or accounts making the exact same comments across multiple influencers and posts. Storck says the algorithm is similar to what e-mail users lean on to sort out spam.

The CPMs are based on the spending estimates and effective reach, which not only subtracts fake followers, but also uses estimates of how many legitimate followers actually see posts, leaning on engagement rates for posts and norms for viewership gleaned from actual influencers, who get such information from their own Instagram business accounts, for example.

The top influencer spenders last month, as estimated by Points North, include names you’ve likely heard of, such as Amazon, Walmart and Mercedes Benz, but also the more obscure—at least until that influencer spending kicks in—like Flat Tummy, Waist Gang Society and SugarBearHair vitamins.

Among the most efficient spenders was Heinz Ketchup, owned by the Kraft Heinz and the ever-thrifty 3G Capital; Ulta Beauty; and Clorox Co.‘s Hidden Valley, all with CPMs around $2 or less.

P&G also had a brand on the top 10 most efficient, Vicks.

Below, top spenders, most efficient, and most fake followers.

Top Influencer Marketing Spenders on Instagram

Points North Group (March 2018)

Rank Advertiser Estimated Spend
1 Flat Tummy Co $1,560,178
2 Amazon $646,212
3 Mercedes-Benz $515,697
4 Land O’Lakes $455,586
5 Stella Artois $423,175
6 Walmart $329,957
7 Waist Gang Society $317,783
8 SugarBearHair $316,182
9 Freeform $304,357
10 Calvin Klein $250,763

Most Efficient

Brands Achieving Lowest Effective CPMs for Instagram Sponsored Posts (>$10k Spend) in

Points North Group (March 2018)

Rank Advertiser CPM
1 Heinz Ketchup $1.78
2 Ulta Beauty $2.02
3 Hidden Valley $2.11
4 SuspiciouS Antwerp $2.13
5 Marc Jacobs Beauty $2.56
6 Chloé $2.97
7 Vicks $3.09
8 Call of Duty $3.12
9 Justice $3.16
10 BioClarity $3.19

Most Fake Followers

Points North Group (March 2018)

Rank Advertiser % Fake Followers
1 Ritz-Carlton 78%
2 Aquaphor 52%
3 L’Occitane 39%
4 Pampers 32%
5 DSW 29%
6 Crocs 25%
7 Lulus 22%
8 Neiman Marcus 22%
9 Magnum Ice Cream 20%
10 Olay 19%

5 Disruptions to Marketing, Part 1: Digital Transformation (2018 Update)

5_disruptions_2018_digital_transformation

At the end of last year, Scott Brinker wrote a series on 5 disruptions to marketing. This is his article. Thank you Scott!

I wanted to look beyond the typical kind of prediction posts that we are inundated with at holiday season to scope out the larger changes underway over the next 3-5 years:

  1. Digital transformation redefines “marketing” beyond the marketing department.
  2. Microservices & APIs (and open source) form the fabric of marketing infrastructure.
  3. Vertical competition presents a greater strategic threat than horizontal competition.
  4. AR, MR, VR, IoT, wearables, conversational interfaces, etc. give us digital everything.
  5. Artificial intelligence multiplies the operational complexity of marketing & business.

Now that we’re one year along this journey, let’s revisit how those trends are progressing and consider what we’re likely to see with them in the year ahead. These aren’t “predictions,” but rather “updates” on the big multi-year themes that are reshaping marketing as we know it.

As with last year’s series, I’ll break this up into five parts for easier digestion.

1. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION (2018 Update)

Total Customer Experience: Marketing + Sales + Customer Service + Product

The essence of digital transformation is that marketing, sales, service — and most of all — product are all being entwined together under the banner of “customer experience.”

Naturally, that makes sense from the customer’s point-of-view. How much delight or disgust do customers feel across the entire spectrum of engagements they have with your company, from the very first touchpoint onward?

Their whole end-to-end experience is the product.

The five things that make this transformational are:

  1. All of these touchpoints are either digital or digitally-supported.
  2. Orchestrating these touchpoints is inherently a cross-organizational mission.
  3. Marketing is increasingly at the center of that orchestration.
  4. Marketing is embedded in the product (and, vice versa, product in the marketing).
  5. The resulting end-to-end experience for customers is how smart companies are disrupting their competitors — e.g., Uber isn’t the car ride, it’s the whole seamless experience.

A report produced a couple of months ago by the CMO Council asked CMOs to identify one — and importantly, only one — top mandate that they had for the year ahead. As shown in the chart below, 67% reported a cross-organizational mandate on growth and/or customer experience.

Marketing's Top Mandate for 2018

Of course, it’s one thing to talk about customer experience, another to actually effect it.

But as Barry Levine wrote on MarTech Today a couple months ago, “At our most recent MarTech Conference, there seemed to be a transformation percolating throughout the sessions and presentations. After several false starts in previous years, it seemed to me that ‘marketing’ is now clearly becoming something bigger.”

In many ways, marketing is looking, sounding and feeling less like its traditional role of “demand generation” and more like “experience management.” — Barry Levine

Aetna: Customer Experience as Marketing

David Edelman, CMO of Aetna, emphasized in his keynote at MarTech how marketing was now deeply engaged in helping to shape customer experience — including pioneering mobile and wearable touchpoints that innovate the very nature of the relationship between the company and its customers.

Successful marketing-led customer experience projects and programs shared by other speakers at MarTech included:

  • Keurig Green Mountain, launching connected coffee machines that enable a whole new kind of digitally-augmented customer experience with their products
  • Staples, using marketing analytics to map and improve steps across the customer journey that spanned traditionally separate teams within the firm
  • Dr. Martens, implementing omni-channel personalization seamlessly across email, their e-commerce site, and social media in ways that genuinely amplified their brand

And that’s just a representative sample. The thing that they all have in common: marketing is being embedded into the product/service and the end-to-end customer experience.

Last year I wondered whether marketing would continue to rise to the challenge of this scope explosion — from communications to experiences. Over the past year, I’ve been excited to see so many marketing teams embrace this opportunity in the charge of digital transformation.

Marketing as Customer Experience

But there’s another aspect of digital transformation in marketing that I’ve noticed over the past year: the changes in what marketers were actually doing. Not just shifts in their mission — i.e., delivering delightful customer experience. But shifts in what they’re building with their hands and minds to achieve that mission.

Empowered by a plethora of marketing technologies that are widely accessible to and usable by non-technical, “generalist” marketers, ordinary citizens of the marketing department have increasingly become do-it-yourself wizards in crafting digital interactions with customers, digital workflows throughout their organizations — beyond marketing, into sales, service, finance, etc. — and dynamic data dashboards, models, and reports.

I use the phrase “citizens of the marketing department” quite intentionally, because these wizard-like capabilities that marketers are acquiring align with three big IT-democratization movements:

Citizen Developers on the Rise

  • CITIZEN DEVELOPERS — who use no-code or low-code tools to create web apps, mobile apps, interactive content, bots, and other kinds of functional experiences for staff, prospects, and customers
  • CITIZEN INTEGRATORS — who use iPaaS and other workflow automation tools to create business processes on-the-fly, intelligently routing data and triggering activities across multiple teams
  • CITIZEN ANALYSTS or even CITIZEN DATA SCIENTISTS — who easily pull together business intelligence data from a variety of sources on demand, analyze it, visualize it, tease out insights, and even automate decisions around it

That’s not to say that these “citizens” have eliminated the need for “experts” wholesale. There is still plenty of work that requires professional developers, systems integrators, and data scientists. But the scope of what individual marketers can build on their own is astounding — and unprecedented.

This is digital transformation in a company’s internal ecosystem. The kind of power that would have taken teams of experts and weeks of work to implement an idea even just 5 years ago is now in the hands of individual citizen marketers to instantiate almost immediately.

And as marketing technology continues to race forward, their power to create only grows.

The Transformation of Selling: How Digital Enables Seamless Selling

A preview of new, very cogent, research from Altimeter, a Prophet Company. One of my top 10 digital content and thought leadership inspiration sources.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

While “social selling” is a key idea that has emerged over the past few years,  it is clear that something larger is afoot. Keeping up with fast-moving and  well-informed customers requires sales departments to focus less on the hard  sell and more on adding value to the experience and relationship via digital  channels. Moreover, selling must become seamless, bridging traditional  department silos like Marketing, Sales, and Service to meet customers  wherever they may engage an organization.

This report examines the transformation of selling in complex transactions,  such as those typically done in business-to-business (B2B) sales or high-  consideration consumer sales. Three types of transitions drive the digital  transformation process: Platform Integration, Organization, and Culture.

Notably, while digital technologies may drive the transformation, the strategic  focus for sales teams must include changing organization and culture such that  customers become the core of the selling process.

INTEGRATION OF DATA, INSIGHTS, AND CONTENT PLATFORMS LAYS THE FOUNDATION.

Digital Transformation of Sales 3 Transitions

On the surface, integration appears to revolve around technology platforms. But Jerome  Thiebaud, Director of Global Digital Workplace Marketing at Avanade, pointed out a subtle  difference, saying, “It’s not because you have technology that you are going to be successful  in the marketplace. It’s because you have technology that allows you to focus more on the  customer, and on the human interaction.” Most companies have an overabundance of  technology but lack the integration between those platforms to keep customers at the center.

Maureen Blandford, CMO of Software Improvement Group, affirms, “Integration is the  new black. We’re trying to build as small a technology stack as possible, with optimal  integration.” Here are some of the top integration efforts organizations should prioritize to  transform selling.

PUT THE POWER OF DIGITAL DATA AND CONTENT IN THE HANDS OF EMPLOYEES TO ENGAGE PARTNERS AND CLIENTS.

At the most basic level, digitizing Sales means more than getting them equipment and loading them up with software and content — it’s about making sure that these enabling  technologies are tuned to drive better engagement with customers. At CBRE,  one of

the world’s largest commercial real estate firms, a key goal was to enable salespeople  to demonstrate their deep understanding of their clients’ businesses by using digital  to establish and scale thought leadership and thus trust. CBRE took all of the paper  materials its salespeople used to hand out to clients and put them on iPads. They built  a proprietary iOS app called Engaged, enabling corporate, 400 local offices and 75,000  employees to quickly access relevant assets digitally. The app enables salespeople to  add interactive and engaging content, like video, to their presentations and pitches on

the fly, without having to go back to IT for help. At the same time, CBRE recognized that  social media was becoming a more important force.

“If you’re looking for [real estate] space, you’re not going to be looking on Twitter,”  acknowledges CBRE’s Trey Tubbs. “But our clients, prospective clients, and people in our  industry follow us on social media. An article will go out and be well-received by people  we never expected to be interested.”

LEVERAGE EXISTING TOOLS RATHER THAN SEEKING OUT NEW ONES.

Rather than try to select, install, and adopt a new technology, sometimes it’s faster and easier to tap an established one and modify existing processes instead.

At Intel, the Marketing group leveraged the  existing Brand IQ platform, rather than create a new tool, to create a content aggregator,  which became a one-stop shop for anyone to post and share content. Different Sales  roles would share different types of content that they found helpful.

Danielle Miller, Global Social Business Strategist and Manager at Intel, recalls, “We  were finding that everybody likes the bright shiny tool. ‘Let’s just get a tool!’ But there  needs to be recognition that we look at the internal processes so that it serves as a  solid foundation for the future, because we knew there was a limit to how many tools a  salesperson can manage.”

DISTRIBUTE  CUSTOMER DATA AND LISTENING THROUGHOUT THE ORGANIZATION. DATA IS A GREAT WAY TO OPEN WINDOWS BETWEEN SILOS.

Selling transformation silos

The avowed goal of many digital transformation efforts is to have a perfect, 360-degree view of everything a customer does, on and off your site. The reality is that this will take years, and you can’t afford to wait. Several  organizations we spoke with described how they took a first basic step of integrating  operational and social media data about customers into their CRM profiles.

At thyssenkrupp Elevator Asia Pacific, digital was the way to open windows between the  silos, enabling the organization to look at its customers through the same customer data  lens. The company has diverse customers ranging from sophisticated building managers  in Singapore to first time developers in China, altogether using 250,000 elevators,  escalators, and moving walkways throughout Asia Pacific. The first step was to put all  sales brochures and materials on tablets so that relevant assets were easy for teams to  access and for Marketing to update. In addition, the tablets gave thyssenkrupp’s teams  direct access to data on equipment breakdowns and on how quickly service issues were  addressed. They could then create customer-specific presentations to demonstrate the  value of their products and services.

Similarly, thyssenkrupp sources data from social listening that identifies problems at  customer sites before they become major problems. That data flows into various CRM  systems and can proactively trigger a visit by thyssenkrupp to the customer.

“We’re generating leads from what we can observe in the public social space,” explained  Kelly Truax, VP of Service Support at thyssenkrupp Elevator Asia Pacific. “We have full-  time people in place who monitor social channels, looking for our competitors’ unhappy  customers, but also watching out for any of our own customers who may need assistance  before they approach us.”

TAP INTO ANALYTICS AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TO IMPROVE CONTENT CREATION AND ENGAGEMENT.

Given the rising digital sophistication of buyers, Marketing can’t get away with creating “one-size-fits-all” collateral anymore. The problem with most content isn’t that there isn’t enough, but rather that there’s too much of the wrong kind. A study  by Docurated found that a third of a sales rep’s time is spent searching for or creating  content — time that could have been spent engaging in sales conversations. To address  this, organizations are using marketing technology to support the content needs of  salespeople. For example, Dun & Bradstreet uses digital intelligence to perform lookalike  modeling that identifies the next best action and then programmatically creates and  delivers relevant content — either to the salesperson or directly to the customer. On  larger accounts, Marketing works closely with Sales to deploy the right set of tactics —  such as  architecting workshops, creating custom content, or designing events.

Machine learning can also provide context, discerning and anticipating what customers  are looking for. IBM uses artificial intelligence to answer basic questions or offer free trials  based on interactions with customers. When the conversation gets to the point where the  customer is using buying language or asking deep technical questions, the program will  engage the appropriate sales or technical rep.

“A tool like this can nurture thousands of prospects all at once who are all driving towards  the same goal,” explains Jeannette Browning, worldwide manager of IBM Watson’s  Digital Client Cognitive Evangelism team. “It’s an interesting combination of tech support  and learning, while providing key digital assets.” Machines will become smart enough to be able to interact with humans — and also realize when it’s necessary for a human to  take over and enact the “escalate to human” sub-routine.

A complete 10 page report overview can be found on SlideShare.

Thank you Charlene Li, Altimeter.

Pricepoints! Bookmarked InsightWhy we have 22-hour interviews

I bookmarked Why we have 22-hour interviews on Medium.

Don’t settle for the best customer experience in your industry, deliver the best one—period. Carmax

Jim Lyski Oct 2017

Carmax_mm1.1

In an environment of rapidly changing customer expectations, if your team isn’t testing and learning daily to improve the customer experience, then you’re likely already behind. Change is no longer happening over months or even years—it’s happening now. Customers expect to be “wowed” from the moment they start shopping on their mobile device to when they step foot in your stores.

1052-CarMax-Executive-Perspective-Download

The auto industry, like most other verticals, has seen a drastic change in shopper behavior. Ten years ago, the average used-car buyer visited five to seven dealerships before selecting a car. Now, with online research, the average buyer doesn’t even make it to two. While nine out of 10 CarMax customers start their experience online, almost all of them finish in store.

As an omnichannel retailer, we are focused on interacting with customers whenever and however they want to shop.

Held to new standards

People don’t evaluate their experiences by vertical anymore. It used to be, “I’ll compare CarMax against all other used car dealers,” or “I’ll compare Nordstrom against all other clothing retailers.” Now customers are taking the best experiences from one industry and demanding a similar or better experience in others.

At CarMax, this means we’re not competing against the best experience consumers have ever had buying a car, we’re competing against the best experience they’ve ever had—period. A customer can order a very personalized cup of coffee every morning. Why can’t she have an experience that’s customized for her when she buys a car?

That means everything must be personalized, from the mobile marketing messages to the in-store experience. For us, that requires anticipating customer needs. Is her priority researching the best car for her needs? Is it speed or convenience? Is financing the first step in her car buying process?

Use search to identify needs

Search and user data are great identifiers to discover unique needs. Based on their behavior on CarMax.com, we can use anonymized visitor-level data to determine whether a customer will be more suited for standard messaging related to CarMax’s customer offers, or messaging related to financing. Then we can personalize accordingly.

Connect the online and in-store experience

Customers expect a seamless shopping experience, and we see the mobile device as the bridge between the digital and physical. Synchronized browsing will be an important part of the CarMax shopping experience of the future.

Let’s say a customer is coming into the store to check out a Toyota Camry, but we also know that she did a lot of searching for other Japanese sedans. With that in mind, the Toyota Camry would be ready at her appointment, but the Nissan Altima and a Honda Accord would also be available and ready for test drives. By knowing more about the customer and her pre-purchase research, we believe it’s possible to develop a better informed and seamless car buying experience.

Another way synchronized browsing could come to life is through pairing mobile devices with iBeacon solutions on our lots. If a customer has her mobile device in hand as she’s walking and browsing, it can become her guide to inventory as mobile alerts pop up with guidance.

Test for better results

Providing stellar experiences requires testing and constant iteration.

We conduct experiments incessantly, with discovery and delivery going on concurrently. Having a constant cadence of little discoveries is not only a faster way to deliver new experiences to the consumer, but it’s actually a much lower-risk way to deliver innovation to market.

A few years ago, we realized that we weren’t meeting rising customer expectations for car photos. Google Analytics data showed that fewer than half of the photos for individual cars were being viewed. Our employees often took many photographs of the vehicle, but not necessarily the photographs customers cared most about. To solve this issue, we surveyed customers and began tagging photo types to learn more, then tested and refined a new photo-capture process to improve the images for a consistent experience.

Analytics also help us see which photos customers clicked, in what order, and for how long of a duration. This allows us to tell which pictures are most engaging for the consumer. For example, when people are buying an SUV, they want to look at a photo of the trunk of the vehicle so they can see how much storage space there is. Now we can make sure that SUV listings have clear photos of the storage areas.

As a result of our improvements to our photo capture and display process, 20% more customers now look at a dozen or more photos in a series, making them better informed and more likely to purchase.

Empower your teams

Whatever vertical you’re in, the more you can anticipate customers’ needs every step of the way, the happier they’ll be. To achieve this, it’s critical to empower your teams to analyze and learn as well as test and fail.

At the core of each of our product teams is a product manager, a lead UX designer, a business analyst/data scientist, and a lead developer. We never tell these teams how to solve a particular problem—just what to solve, providing them KPIs to work toward and empowering them to solve for customer needs. The teams develop a hypothesis, run an experiment, analyze the results, and identify if their solution will improve the customer experience while delivering business results. They are constantly iterating as they work toward their goal.

We’re willing to try almost anything. If it improves the experience, we’ll implement it, and if it doesn’t improve it, then we move on to the next experiment.

Who cares if you tried and failed? As long as you’ve learned something, then you’re always getting smarter about your customers and how to meet their needs.